Keyword: ion
Paper Title Other Keywords Page
MOA01 Frontier Technologies and Future Directions in High Intensity ISOL RIB Production target, proton, ISOL, vacuum 1
  • P.G. Bricault, F. Ames, N. Bernier, M. Dombsky, P. Kunz, F.S. Labrecque, J. Lassen, A. Mjøs, M. Nozar, J. Wong
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
  Funding: TRIUMF is funded by a contribution from the federal government through the National Research Council of Canada
The future frontier of the ISOL technique is to increase the intensity of the RIB beams. In the ISOL technique there are several ways to increase substantially the production of rare isotope beam. The most expedient one is to increase the incident beam on target. Increasing the overall release efficiency and ionization efficiency are the other two easiest ways to increase the overall RIB intensity. Now with the TRIUMF/ISAC facility the ISOL RIB facility can operate routinely up to 50 kW, this is 100 μA on target. But, the driver beam intensity cannot increase without considering the radiation damage issues and the challenge to the ion source itself where ionization efficiency are dramatically affected by target out-gazing. The other technology challenge for the ISOL technique is the target material itself. The main concern is the capability of the target material to sustain high power density deposited by the driver beam. Refractory metals foil target are suitable but nevertheless very limited in the available species we can produce with those targets. Composite targets, either for carbide and oxide target material were developed at ISAC that can sustain very high power density.
slides icon Slides MOA01 [3.651 MB]  
MOB01 The FRIB Project – Accelerator Challenges and Progress linac, cryomodule, cavity, controls 8
  • J. Wei, E.C. Bernard, N.K. Bultman, F. Casagrande, S. Chouhan, C. Compton, K.D. Davidson, A. Facco, P.E. Gibson, T . Glasmacher, L.L. Harle, K. Holland, M.J. Johnson, S. Jones, D. Leitner, M. Leitner, G. Machicoane, F. Marti, D. Morris, J.A. Nolen, J.P. Ozelis, S. Peng, J. Popielarski, L. Popielarski, E. Pozdeyev, T. Russo, K. Saito, R.C. Webber, J. Weisend, M. Williams, Y. Yamazaki, A. Zeller, Y. Zhang, Q. Zhao
    FRIB, East Lansing, USA
  • D. Arenius, V. Ganni
    JLAB, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under Cooperative Agreement DE-SC0000661
The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, a new national user facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science to be constructed and operated by MSU, is currently being designed to provide intense beams of rare isotopes to better understand the physics of nuclei, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental interactions, and applications for society. The FRIB driver linac can accelerate all stable isotopes to energies beyond 200 MeV/u at beam powers up to 400 kW. Key technical R&D programs include low-beta cw SRF cryomodules and highly efficient charge stripping using a liquid lithium film or helium gas. Physical challenges include acceleration of multiple charge states of beams to meet beam-on-target requirements, efficient production and acceleration of intense heavy-ion beams from low to intermediate energies, accommodation of multiple charge stripping scenarios and ion species, designs for both baseline in-flight fragmentation and ISOL upgrade options, and design considerations of machine availability, tunability, reliability, maintainability, and upgradability. We report on the FRIB accelerator design and developments with emphasis on technical challenges and progress.
slides icon Slides MOB01 [4.891 MB]  
MOB04 Argonne In-flight Radioactive Ion Separator dipole, multipole, simulation, target 24
  • S.L. Manikonda, M. Alcorta, B. Back, J.A. Nolen, R.C. Pardo, E. Rehm, G. Savard, D. Seweryniak
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • B. Erdelyi
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, USA
  Funding: This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357
The Argonne In-flight Radioactive Ion Separator (AIRIS) is a new large recoil separator that is being designed as a part of proposed future upgrade of the ATLAS facility to provide at least 10 times more collection efficiency than the existing system. In combination with other proposed upgrades it will provide a 2 orders of magnitude gain in the intensity for the in-flight produced secondary beams compared to the existing facility. The resulting unprecedented intensities for the recoil beam open new opportunities in several physics domains, e.g. gamma ray spectroscopy after secondary reactions, reactions for rp‐, νp‐, αp‐ processes and CNO cycle. The proposed design for the AIRIS device is based on four multipole magnets and four dipole magnets arranged in a so called broadband spectrometer configuration. This arrangement will be followed by two RF cavities to provide further selection based on velocity differences between the primary beam tail and the recoiling RIB. The advantages of such a design and key parameters will be discussed. We will demonstrate the performance of the device for few representative reaction cases that can be studied using AIRIS.
slides icon Slides MOB04 [1.626 MB]  
MOB05 Rare-Isotope Beam Facilities in Asia linac, cyclotron, heavy-ion, ISOL 28
  • O. Kamigaito
    RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Japan
  Growing activities in the RIB facilities in Asian countries will be reviewed. Current status and future development will be discussed.  
slides icon Slides MOB05 [8.967 MB]  
MOC01 Progress and Plans for High Mass Beam Delivery at TRIUMF linac, rfq, ISAC, target 33
  • M. Marchetto
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
  ISAC is a TRIUMF facility for production and post-acceleration of radioactive ion beams (RIB). The RIBs are produced in two targets using a 500 MeV proton of up to 0.1 mA. The produced radioactive species are then ionized, extracted up to 60 kV, mass selected and transported to either the low energy experimental area or to the post-accelerators. The first stage of acceleration is accomplished via an RFQ followed by a DTL; at this medium stage the energy ranges between 0.15 MeV/u and 1.8 MeV/u for 3≤A/q≤7. The second stage of the acceleration uses a 40 MV superconducting linac for a final energy up to 18 MeV/u. High mass (>30) beams need multiple charges to be accepted by the RFQ. The single charge ions out of the target source are charge bred using an ECR charge state booster. The breeding process generates a significant amount of background contamination that masks the desired ions inside a mixed ”cocktail” beam. Such a cocktail needs to be cleaned of contaminants. An unprecedented effort is going on at TRIUMF trying to clean the high mass cocktail beams using the accelerator chain as filter. The progress and future plans of the project will be presented in this paper.  
slides icon Slides MOC01 [3.144 MB]  
MOC04 Commissioning Experience with CARIBU background, ion-source, plasma, ECR 45
  • R.C. Vondrasek, S.I. Baker, P. Bertone, S. Caldwell, J.A. Clark, C.N. Davids, D. Lascar, A. Levand, K. Lister, R.C. Pardo, D. Peterson, D.R. Phillips, G. Savard, J.V. Schelt, M.G. Sternberg, T. Sun, B. Zabransky
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS superconducting linac facility aims at providing low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. These beams are obtained from fission fragments of a Cf-252 source, thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred with an ECR ion source to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. Low-energy mass separated radioactive beams have been extracted, charge bred with a 10% efficiency, reaccelerated to 6 MeV/u, and delivered to GAMMASPHERE for beta decay studies. In addition, the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer has been relocated to the CARIBU low-energy beam line. Mass measurements on over 42 neutron rich nuclei have already been performed and additional measurements are underway. In addition, a new tape station for beta decay studies has just been commissioned. In this talk I will describe the current status of the overall CARIBU system and the plans for bringing the system into full operation and use in research with accelerated beams.  
slides icon Slides MOC04 [3.744 MB]  
PO02 GANIL Operation Status and Upgrade of SPIRAL1 booster, target, ion-source, acceleration 51
  • F. Chautard, O. Bajeat, P. Delahaye, M. Dubois, P. Jardin, O. Kamalou, L. Maunoury, G. Sénécal
    GANIL, Caen, France
  The GANIL facility (Caen, France) is dedicated to the acceleration of heavy ion beams for nuclear physics, atomic physics, radiobiology and material irradiation. The production of stable and radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics studies represents the main part of the activity. The exotic beams are produced by the Isotope Separation On-Line method (ISOL, the SPIRAL1 facility) with SPIRAL1 facility. It is running since 2001, producing and post-accelerating radioactive ion beams. The review of the operation from 2001 to 2011 is presented. Because of the physicist demands, the facility is about to be improved with the project Upgrade SPIRAL1. The goal of the project is to extend the range of post-accelerated exotic beams avalaible.  
PO03 The RIB Dynamics of the SPIRAL 2 Transfer Line quadrupole, solenoid, extraction, emittance 54
  • D. Boutin, F.R. Osswald
    IPHC, Strasbourg Cedex 2, France
  • N.Yu. Kazarinov
    JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, Russia
  • C. Peaucelle
    IN2P3 IPNL, Villeurbanne, France
  • T. Thuillier
    LPSC, Grenoble, France
  The design of the SPIRAL 2 RIB extraction and mass analysis results of previous experiences at Ganil (SIRa) and SPIRAL* and concerns the ISOL process. The layout presents different beam sections of optical interest starting with a conventional Einzel lens, a 1 T solenoid, a triplet of magnetic quadrupoles and a magnetic dipole for the mass analysis. The down-stream 1+ ions transfer line to the users is designed following a conservative solution composed of emittance limitation, homothetic betatron matching, passive and symmetrical optical lattices (point to point and unitary transport) as well as beam instrumentation enabling the control of the losses (pepperpots, slits, beam profilers, FC, etc.). The presentation will mainly focus on the description of the beam line, its characteristics and on some side effects which have to be taken into account in order to match the beam properly during the operations.
* On Line Isotopic Separator Test Benches at GANIL, R. Anne et al., PAC
proceed. ed. IEEE, 1993
PO09 Progress on the RFQ Beam Cooler Design for SPES Project rfq, emittance, vacuum, injection 68
  • M.M. Maggiore, F. Chiurlotto, M. Comunian, A. Dainelli, M. De Lazzari, A. Galatà, A. Minarello, A.M. Porcellato, S. Stark
    INFN/LNL, Legnaro (PD), Italy
  The SPES project is the new Radioactive Ion Beam facility under construction at Laboratori Nazionali of Legnaro, Italy. In this framework in order to improve the beam quality in terms of transversa emittance and energy spread, a study of a new RFQ beam cooler device is in progress. The electromagnetic design of the RFQ section and the electrostatic layout of the injection and extraction regions have been done. The study about the beam dynamic is going on by means of dedicated codes which allow to take into account the interaction of the ions with the buffer gas needed to cool the beams. The preliminary design of the device is carrying on at LNL since 2011 and the feasibility study is funded by V committee of INFN in the framework of REGATA experiment. Both beam dynamics study and the electromagnetic design are presented in this work.  
PO12 Damage Situation of the 12UD Pelletron Tandem Accelerator at the University of Tsukuba by the Great East Japan Earthquake tandem-accelerator, ion-source, FEL, high-voltage 80
  • K. Sasa
    UTTAC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
  The 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the University of Tsukuba suffered serious damage from the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. On the day, the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was in operation at 8 MV. A main tank of the 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator located from downstairs 4th floor to 7th floor was strongly shaken by the shock of the earthquake. All high voltage accelerating columns fell down in the accelerator tank. The situation of damage and a post-quake reconstruction project of the Tandem Accelerator Facility at the University of Tsukuba will be reported.  
PO17 Simulation of Electron and Ion Dynamics in an EBIS electron, simulation, background, space-charge 97
  • L. Zhao, E.G. Evstati, J.S. Kim
    Far-Tech, Inc., San Diego, California, USA
  • E.N. Beebe, A.I. Pikin
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  Funding: Grant supported by DOE office of Nuclear Physics
To model the dynamics of the ions in an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), a time-dependent, self-consist particle-in-cell Monte Carlo code (EBIS-PIC) has been developed by FAR-TECH, Inc. The energetic background electron beam is modeled by PBGUNS ( by dividing the long beam path into several segments to resolve the big length-to-radius spatial scaling problem. The injected primary ions and ionized neutral gas ions are tracked using Monte Carlo method which includes the ionization, charge-exchange and Coulomb collisions with the electron beam and the neutral gas in the potential well, which is calculated by solving the Poisson equation each time step. EBIS-PIC has been able to predict the spatial and velocity space distributions and the evolution of the charge state distribution (CSD) of trapped ions in EBIS devices operating in fast or slow trapping mode. The physical model of EBIS-PIC code and the simulations of the trapping and charge-breeding of injected Cs+1 ions on the Test EBIS* at BNL will be presented. The simulation results have shown good consistency with the experiments.
* S. Kondrashev, J.G. Alessi, E.N.Beebe, C. Dickerson, P.N.Ostroumov, A. Pikin, G. Savard, NIMPR. A, 642 (2011), 18-24.
PO18 Tandem EBIS electron, injection, solenoid, extraction 101
  • A.I. Pikin, J.G. Alessi, E.N. Beebe, M. Okamura, D. Raparia, J. Ritter, L. Snydstrup
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  Funding: Work supported under the auspices of the US Department of Energy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
A method to increase the ion beam intensity of RHIC EBIS by extending its ion trap into magnetic field of an additional superconducting solenoid is described. The strong axial support of the cold masses in these solenoids is required to place them on a common axis close to each other. Such configuration of solenoids allows to produce a long EBIS with a single electron gun, electron collector and injection system. Preliminary calculations of magnetic forces, magnetic field and potential distributions are presented along with proposed structure of the ion traps.
TUA01 Heavy Ion Accelerator Development at IUAC Delhi heavy-ion, linac, ion-source, niobium 105
  • D. Kanjilal
    IUAC, New Delhi, India
  Inter University Accelerator Centre has been involved in the development of heavy ion accelerators, ion sources, beam lines and experimental facilities for providing various heavy ion beams in a wide energy range varying from a few tens of keV to hundreds of MeV for experiments by more than four hundred research groups from all over India and abroad. A large vertical Pelletron electrostatic tandem accelerator capable of achieving terminal voltage up to 16MV has been in operational for more than a couple of decades. Superconducting niobium linac booster accelerating modules having eight niobium quarter wave resonators each have been developed and used. A high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (HTS-ECRIS) was designed, fabricated and installed. It is in regular operation for production of highly charged ion beams for alternate high current injector (HCI) system consisting of radio frequency quadrupole and drift tube Linacs. Details of developments of various heavy ion beam facilities and experimental systems at IUAC will be presented.  
slides icon Slides TUA01 [5.689 MB]  
TUA02 A Cost-Effective Energy Upgrade of the ALPI Linac at INFN-Legnaro linac, simulation, cavity, ion-source 106
  • G. Bisoffi, M. Comunian, A. Facco, A. Galatà, P. Modanese, R. Pengo, A. Pisent, A.M. Porcellato, S. Stark
    INFN/LNL, Legnaro (PD), Italy
  • B.B. Chalykh
    ITEP, Moscow, Russia
  The ALPI SC linac at INFN-LNL is being constantly upgraded in terms of maximum beam energy (Ef) and current, made available for experiments. Presently, a liquid-N cooling scheme is being applied to the RF power couplers of the 16 full Nb resonators, to keep them locked at 5 MV/m, vs. present 3 MV/m. A further upgrade of the 44 “medium beta section” cavities, changing the cavity Cu substrates, was prototyped and is reported at this conference: however it is not fully funded yet and is extremely time-consuming. A cost-effective Ef upgrade is proposed here: to move 2 SC buncher cryostats, which house a single working SC QWR but were designed for 4, at the end of ALPI, equipping them with 4 Nb/Cu QWRs each (new bunchers would either be NC QWRs or a single SC cavity cryostat). The contribution of these cryostats to Ef would be extremely effective: e.g. a Ef~10 MeV/A (Ibeam≥ 1 pnA) Pb beam, a very attractive tool for the Nuclear Physics community, is achievable. A being performed upgrade of ALPI cryoplant, expected to increase the refrigeration capability by ~25%, makes this change possible today. Details of this solutions, as well as its limits, will be presented and discussed  
slides icon Slides TUA02 [3.722 MB]  
TUB01 Development of NRA System for a 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator-Human Resource Development Program for Nuclear Engineering, The University of Tokyo electron, resonance, target, proton 115
  • S. Ito, H. Matsuzaki, A. Morita
    The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  The 1.7MV tandem accelerator (RAPID) at the University of Tokyo has been used for various research projects and educational studies since its installation in 1994. Recently RAPID has contributed to educational program for study by utilizing high sensitive ion beam analysis methods of the accelerator. In the fall of 2011, we newly developed a NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) system with BGO scintillator. Detecting the resonant reaction 19F (p, αγ) 16O, a special student experimental class was successfully performed as a “Human resource development program for nuclear engineering”. The feature of this experiment is very few in advanced case study, which has performed with combine multiple ion beam correspond to a purpose for experiment. In this program students make their own samples for NRA analysis by ion implantation. Later in the year, RAPID will be relocated to the University of Tokyo (HIT facility) in Ibaraki prefecture to replace the 1MV tandem accelerator which was damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March of 2011.  
slides icon Slides TUB01 [1.426 MB]  
TUB02 New Developments at the Tandem Accelerators Laboratory at IFIN-HH ion-source, tandem-accelerator, controls, vacuum 118
  • D.G. Ghita, I.C. Calinescu, S. Dobrescu, N.M. Marginean, I.O. Mitu, T.B. Sava, B. Savu
    IFIN, Magurele- Bucuresti, Romania
  • Gh. Cata-Danil, M.S. Dogaru, M. Enachescu, M.M. Gugiu, P. Ionescu, D.V. Mosu, A. Pantelica, D. Pantelica, A. Petre, I. Popescu, C.A. Simion, C. Stan-Sion, M. Statescu, N.V. Zamfir
    Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest, Romania
  The upgrade of the 9 MV Tandem accelerator at IFIN-HH started in 2007. Remarkable improvements were done in the last 5 years that can be seen in the improved performance and reliability of the machine. Using original preparation techniques, some new beam species were tested for the first time in our laboratory. This opened the door to new experiments. A major improvement for the laboratory is the installation of 1 MV Tandetron accelerator dedicated to ultra-sensitive AMS measurements of C-14, Be-10, Al-26 and I-129, and 3 MV Tandetron accelerator dedicated to ion beam analysis. The main directions of the research activity in the laboratory will be shortly presented.  
slides icon Slides TUB02 [3.686 MB]  
TUB03 Terminal Voltage Stabilization of Pelletron Tandem Accelerator controls, feedback, acceleration, electron 124
  • N.R. Lobanov, M.C. Blacksell, P. Linardakis, D. Tsifakis
    Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
  Funding: Heavy Ion Accelerators Education Investment Fund (EIF)
A conventional corona control terminal voltage stabiliser has been investigated on the ANU 14UD tandem accelerator. The fluctuations in the charge transport of electrostatic pelletron generator and their correlation with mechanical oscillations of the chains and terminal voltage ripple have been analysed. Emphasis is placed on the performance of the two-loop feedback system and on the tuning of this system to production of high energy-resolution beams. The transfer function for the corona regulation loop has been determined and examined. The system produces the beam position at the image slit of the 90 energy-analysing magnet with long-term stability equivalent to a few hundred volts rms fluctuation of the terminal voltage. The concept of novel fast control loop utilizing the high-frequency component from the image slits to control the voltage of the last gap of high-energy acceleration tube is discussed.
slides icon Slides TUB03 [4.693 MB]  
TUC01 Physical Design of the SPES Facility rfq, target, plasma, linac 136
  • M. Comunian
    INFN/LNL, Legnaro (PD), Italy
  SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is the Italian project for a radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility based on a cyclotron as primary accelerator and on the existing superconducting linac ALPI as post accelerator. The cyclotron, energy up to 70 MeV and total current of 0.75 mA, shared on two exits, is in construction in the industry. The production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei, with ISOL technique, employs the proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx; the fission rate expected with a proton beam of 40 MeV and 0.2 mA, is 1013 fissions/s. The main goal of physical design of the SPES facility is to provide an accelerator system to perform forefront research in nuclear physics by studying nuclei far from stability, in particular neutron-rich radioactive nuclei with masses in the range of 80–160. The final RIB energy on the experimental target will be up to 11 MeV/A for A = 130, with an intensity in the range of 107–109 pps.  
slides icon Slides TUC01 [5.313 MB]  
TUC02 KEK Digital Accelerator and Recent Beam Commissioning Result injection, acceleration, induction, kicker 143
  • K. Takayama, T. Adachi, T. Arai, D.A. Arakara, E. Kadokura, T. Kawakubo, T. Kubo, H. Nakanishi, K. Okamura, H. Someya, A. Takagi, M. Wake
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
  • H. Asao, Y. Okada
    NETS, Fuchu-shi, Japan
  • Y. Barata, S. Harada
    Tokyo City University, Tokyo, Japan
  • T. Iwashita, K. Okazaki
    Nippon Advanced Technology Co. Ltd., Ibaraki-prefecture, Japan
  • K.W. Leo
    Sokendai, Ibaraki, Japan
  • X. Liu, T. Yoshimoto
    TIT, Yokohama, Japan
  The digital accelerator (DA), which is a small-scale induction synchrotron "*" requiring no high-energy injector and capable of providing various ions, was constructed at KEK"**". Beam commissioning has been carried out. The KEK-DA consists of a 200 kV high voltage terminal, in which a permanent mag. x-band ECRIS is embedded, 15 m long LEBT, ES injection kicker, and a 10 Hz rapid cycle synchrotron equipped with the induction acceleration system. An ion pulse chopped in 5 micro-sec by the newly developed Marx generator driven Einzel lens chopper"***" was guided through the LEBT and injected by the kicker in one turn. 3 micro-sec ion pulse was successfully captured with a pair of barrier voltage-pulses of 2 kV and accelerated up to 12 MeV with another flat induction-acceleration voltage-pulse through an acceleration period of 50 msec. Beam commissioning started with a He1+ ion beam of 100 microA. Details of fully digital-controlled barrier bucket trapping and induction acceleration are described, although the acceleration/extraction is still at a preliminary stage. Some of unique applications, such as laboratory space science using virtual cosmic rays, will be introduced.
* K.Takayama and R.J.Briggs (Eds), “Induction Accelerators”, (Springer, 2010).
** T. Iwashita et al., Phys. Rev. ST-AB 14, 071301 (2011).
*** T.Adachi et al., Rev. Inst. Meth. 82, 083305 (2011).
slides icon Slides TUC02 [2.126 MB]  
TUC03 Laser Ablation of Solids into an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources for Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy laser, ECR, target, plasma 149
  • T. Palchan, F.G. Kondev, S.A. Kondrashev, C. Nair, R.C. Pardo, R.H. Scott, R.C. Vondrasek
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • W. Bauder, P. Collon
    University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA
  • J.F. Berg, T. Maddock, G. Palmotti, G. Youinou
    INL, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA
  • G. Imel
    ISU, Pocatello, Idaho, USA
  • M. Paul
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem, Israel
  • M. Salvatores
    CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France
  Funding: This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
A project using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is underway at the ATLAS facility to measure the atom densities of transmutation products present in samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL. These atom densities will be used to infer effective actinide neutron capture cross-sections ranging from Thorium to Califorium isotopes in different neutron spectra relevant to advanced fuel cycles. This project will require the measurement of many samples with high precision and accuracy. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly-charged positive ions in an ECRIS followed by injection into a linear accelerator. We use a picosecond laser to ablate the actinide material into the ion source. We expect that the laser ablation technique will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than sputtering or oven evaporation thus reducing ‘cross talk’ between samples. In addition a multi-sample holder/changer is part of the project to allow for a quick change between multiple samples. The results of off-line ablation tests and first results of a beam generated by the laser coupled to the ECR will be discussed as well as the overall project schedule.
slides icon Slides TUC03 [1.610 MB]  
TUC04 Experiences and Lessons Learned at CARIBU with an Open 252Cf Source controls, monitoring, neutron 155
  • S.I. Baker, J.P. Greene, A. Levand, R.C. Pardo, G. Savard, R.C. Vondrasek, L.W. Weber
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  Funding: This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
The CARIBU (the CAlifornium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade) project at ATLAS is based on the creation of beams of neutron-rich nuclei produced as fission fragments from the 3% fission branch that occurs naturally in the decay of Cf-252. These fission fragments are thermalized in ultrapure helium gas and turned into a charged beam for use by the ATLAS accelerator or ‘stopped’ beam experiments. This requires a very thin source, electroplated on a stainless steel or platinum backing so that the fission fragments escape into the helium gas and are efficiently thermalized and collected into an ion beam. The information learned from the successive use of two sources with strengths of 2 mCi and 100 mCi has now prepared us for the installation in mid-summer of a 500 mCi source recently produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper will describe the radiological monitoring system and our experience with the two weak “open” sources which have exercised and tested our radiological controls, emissions monitors, and procedures for the CARIBU facility and the source transfer area.
slides icon Slides TUC04 [1.605 MB]  
WEA01 Advanced Accelerator Technology Aspects for Hadron Therapy proton, synchrotron, cyclotron, extraction 156
  • L. Falbo
    CNAO Foundation, Milan, Italy
  Nowadays cancer can be considered as one of the wide spread diseases all around the world. Radiotherapy is the clinical technique used in 40% of cancer treatments: nowadays about 40% of the 18000 particle accelerators running in the world are devoted to radiotherapy. Classical radiotherapy employs photons and electrons that damage not only the diseased cells but also the healthy ones. Hadrontherapy is a high-precision radiotherapy exploiting the depth-dose deposition characteristics of the hadron particles. The realization of machines for hadrontherapy is more challenging than for standard radiotherapy: while most of hospitals have a device for classical radiotherapy, the hadrontherapy needs a dedicated building with the needed technology for the hadron acceleration. The first hadrontherapy treatments have been performed in particle physics research centers clinically adapted; nowadays there are dedicated facilities designed and built as hadrontherapy centers. This paper will give an overview on the existing hadrontherapy centers presenting the technologic background that is at the basis of the hadrontherapy world.  
slides icon Slides WEA01 [4.493 MB]  
WEA02 Focusing of Intense Heavy Ion Beams with Plasma Lenses electron, focusing, plasma, heavy-ion 163
  • O. Meusel, M. Droba, U. Ratzinger, K. Schulte
    IAP, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  Gabor lenses are a special type of plasma lens using a stable confined electron cloud for beam focusing. The electrons provide space charge neutralization of the beam traveling through the lens volume. At the same time a radial symmetric electrostatic self field focuses the beam mass independently. It is possible to control the density and distribution of the confined electrons providing variable focusing strength and moderate emittance growth of the beam. The knowledge of the behavior of the electron column inside this lens type is essential to understand the impact on beam transport. Therefore several diagnostic tools were developed to measure the electron cloud properties with and without ion beam propagation through Gabor lenses. Based on experimental results a new Gabor plasma lens has been designed for focusing heavy ion beams. A comparison of this lens type and a superconducting solenoid is planned at the low energy transport section of the GSI - High Current Test Injector (HOSTI).  
slides icon Slides WEA02 [1.572 MB]  
WEB01 Electron Beam Ion Sources, Traps, and Strings: Versatile Devices to Meet the High Charge State Ion Needs of Modern Facilities electron, ion-source, heavy-ion, collider 164
  • E.N. Beebe, J.G. Alessi, A.I. Pikin
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy, and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Electron beam ion sources (EBIS) and its variants such as the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) and electron string ion source (ESIS) have been selected to provide highly charged ions for several atomic and nuclear physics facilities. Since the capture and breeding can be short and highly efficient, EBIST devices are increasingly being chosen for trapping and/or reacceleration of radioactive beams. The sources can range from petite to grand, using electron beams from ~1mA to 10A or more. They often serve accelerators and beam lines in large laboratories but they can be self contained laboratories where experiments are made in situ. We will discuss the basic principles as well as applications of these sources at various facilities around the world. Some emphasis will be placed on the recently commissioned RHIC EBIS source which is now providing beams for both high energy physics at the relativistic heavy ion collider as well as the NASA space radiation laboratory at BNL.
slides icon Slides WEB01 [2.850 MB]  
WEB02 Commissioning of CARIBU EBIS Charge Breeder Sub-systems gun, electron, cathode, solenoid 165
  • S.A. Kondrashev, C. Dickerson, A. Levand, P.N. Ostroumov, R.C. Vondrasek
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • M.A. Batazova, G.I. Kuznetsov
    BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia
  • A.I. Pikin
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  Funding: This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357.
A high-efficiency charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) to increase the intensity and improve the purity of accelerated neutron-rich radioactive ion beams is being developed by the ANL Physics Division. The design of the EBIS charge breeder is complete and manufacturing of the components and sub-systems is in progress. A 6-Tesla superconducting solenoid and a high-perveance electron gun were recently delivered and successfully commissioned. The current status of the ANL EBIS development and commissioning results of different EBIS sub-systems will be presented.
slides icon Slides WEB02 [1.219 MB]  
WEB03 DREEBIT EBIS/T for Applications in Accelerator Physics ion-source, electron, target, injection 170
  • M. Schmidt, A. Thorn
    DREEBIT GmbH, Dresden, Germany
  • G. Zschornack
    Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Angewandte Physik, Dresden, Germany
  Funding: Supported by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology
Electron Beam Ion Sources and Traps provide light up to heavy ions of low up to high charge states for various applications in accelerator physics such as medical particle therapy and charge breeding. Beside the well-known but quiet costly superconducting EBIS/T type systems compact and permanent magnet-operated EBIS/T from the DREEBIT Company are available, favorable for low-budget projects. Moreover, the "flagship" of the DREEBIT ion source family, the superconducting EBIS-SC features operating parameters comparable to the complex and expensive systems in the EBIS/T community.
slides icon Slides WEB03 [3.655 MB]  
poster icon Poster WEB03 [7.892 MB]  
WEB04 Electron and Ion Beam Dynamics in the CARIBU EBIS Charge Breeder electron, simulation, ion-source, acceleration 172
  • C. Dickerson, S.A. Kondrashev, B. Mustapha, P.N. Ostroumov
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • A.I. Pikin
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  Funding: This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357.
An Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is being built to charge breed ion beams from the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for acceleration in the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The overall efficiency of the source and charge breeder system is important since CARIBU will produce many low intensity radioactive ion species. Simulations of the electron and ion beam dynamics have been used to determine the system’s expected performance. The details of these simulations and results will be presented.
slides icon Slides WEB04 [1.362 MB]  
WEB05 ECRIS Latest Developments electron, ECRIS, ion-source, plasma 173
  • L. Celona, G. Castro, S. Gammino, D. Mascali
    INFN/LNS, Catania, Italy
  • G. Ciavola
    CNAO Foundation, Milan, Italy
  The production of intense beams of highly charged ions (HCI) is one of the most relevant challenge for the future accelerator facilities. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are nowadays the most powerful devices able to feed accelerators with HCI in a reliable and efficient way. The reliability of frontier solutions for magnets and the increased costs for microwave generators make scaling to larger frequency not viable. Any further improvement of ECRIS output currents and average charge state requires a deep understanding of electron and ion dynamics in the plasma. In the past 20 years different teams have been working in the forefront of ion source developments with both experimental and theoretical activities, proposing different solutions to improve the production rate. The paper will discuss the most recent technological developments in the field, worldwide, together with the modeling issues of non-classical evidences like sensitivity of Electron Energy Distribution Function to the magnetic field detuning, influence of plasma turbulences on electron heating and ion confinement, coupling between electron and ion dynamics and relative impact on the formed ion beam.  
WEC03 The SC CW LINAC Demonstrator – 1st Test of an SC CH-cavity with Heavy Ions cavity, linac, solenoid, heavy-ion 182
  • S. Mickat, L.A. Dahl
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • M. Amberg, K. Aulenbacher, W.A. Barth, V. Gettmann, S. Mickat
    HIM, Mainz, Germany
  • D. Bänsch, F.D. Dziuba, D. Mäder, H. Podlech, U. Ratzinger, R. Tiede
    IAP, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  The superconducting (sc) continuous wave (cw) LINAC Demonstrator is a collaboration project between GSI, the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), and the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP) at the Goethe University Frankfurt. The aim is a full performance test of a 217 MHz sc Crossbar H-mode (CH) cavity, which provides gradients of 5.1 MV/m at a total length of 0.69 m. In addition the Demonstrator comprises two 9.3 Tesla sc solenoids. The configuration of a CH-cavity embedded by two sc solenoids is taken from a conceptual layout of a new sc cw LINACwith nine CH-cavities and seven solenoids. Such an accelerator is highly desired by a broad community of users requesting heavy ion beam energies in the Coulomb barrier range. A successful test of such an sc multigap structure are an important milestone towards the proposed cw-LINAC.  
slides icon Slides WEC03 [1.842 MB]  
WEC05 Design Studies for a New Heavy Ion Injector Linac for FAIR linac, heavy-ion, injection, acceleration 191
  • B. Schlitt, W.A. Barth, G. Clemente, W. Vinzenz
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  As the GSI UNILAC started operation in 1975, it will be more than 40 years old when the commissioning of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI will start. To assure reliable operation for FAIR and to provide beams for a variety of experiments, three separate linacs are proposed: 1.) A new superconducting cw heavy-ion linac behind the upgraded high charge state injector HLI shall provide ion beams with high duty cycle and adjustable energy in the MeV/u region for the super-heavy element program as well as for further UNILAC experiments. 2.) A dedicated 70 MeV proton linac will serve as injector for the FAIR pbar physics program. 3.) To deliver high-intensity heavy-ion beams for FAIR, the existing post-stripper linac should be replaced by a new high energy linac with short beam pulses, low pulse repetition rate, and fixed end energy. Conceptual design studies for the latter machine using 108 MHz IH-type drift tube structures will be presented, including a proposal to increase the ion charge states for synchrotron injection as well as a linac beam energy upgrade using 325 MHz CH structures.  
slides icon Slides WEC05 [6.013 MB]  
THA01 Heavy Ion Superconducting Linacs: Status and Upgrade Projects linac, heavy-ion, status 196
  • P.N. Ostroumov
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  Funding: This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357.
We observe that there is an increase in the demand, by the scientific community, for accelerated CW ion beams which can be efficiently provided by SC ion linacs. This demand can be categorized into two areas: existing and new facilities. Existing facilities are being refurbished and upgraded for higher energies and beam intensities. Several new projects are under development or construction worldwide. Recently, development of new SC ion linacs has started in China, Korea and Spain. In this talk I will briefly review both the upgrade and new SC ion linac projects with a primary focus on the advances in heavy-ion linac technologies achieved at ANL in connection with the efficiency and intensity upgrade of ATLAS.
slides icon Slides THA01 [3.981 MB]  
THA03 Status and Upgrade Project of HIRFL heavy-ion, linac, DTL, rfq 198
  • G.Q. Xiao, Y. He, X. Ma, M.T. Song, J.W. Xia, H.S. Xu, J.C. Yang, Y.J. Yuan, H.W. Zhao, X. Zhou
    IMP, Lanzhou, People's Republic of China
  Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou is a heavy ion accelerator complex for nuclear, atomic, and biology application research activities. It is the biggest heavy ion accelerator facility in China, consisting two cyclotrons in series as injector and two cooling storage rings (CSRm and CSRe) as main synclotron and experimental spectrum separately. The species from P to U were accelerated in the machine, And the maximum energy is 1 GeV/u for C. The experimetal teminals are on meterial, biology, canser therapy, SHE, RIB, mass measurement, inner target, and so on. To improve beam intensity and available beam time, a linear injectors SSC-LINAC were proposed in 2009. It consists a 4-rod RFQ and 4 IH-DTL tanks. The RFQ, IH-DTL, and 60 kW solid state amplifier for SSC-LINAC are tested priliminaryly. The operation status and progress of upgrade projects of HIRFL are presented in the paper.  
slides icon Slides THA03 [6.806 MB]  
THB01 New Developments in Low-Z Gas Stripper Sstem at RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) electron, acceleration, target, cyclotron 199
  • H. Okuno, N. Fukunishi, H. Hasebe, H. Imao, O. Kamigaito, M. Kase, H. Kuboki
    RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Japan
  Electron stripping process from heavy ion in material is a useful tool in accelerator complex to give higher charge state of the ion, allowing its effective acceleration. This process is competed with electron capture process and reach to the equilibrium charge state. Carbon foils is convenient for charge stripper but have short lifetime due to thermal stress and sputtering in the case of high power beam of heavy ion such as uranium. Gas is basically free from lifetime but gives lower charge state due to absent of density effect. Therefore, charge stripper especially for uranium beams at 10-20 MeV/u could be a bottle-neck problem in high power heavy ion facility such as RIBF, FRIB and FAIR. A charge stripper using low-Z gas (He or H2) is an important candidate to solve the problem because the high equilibrium mean charge states for the low-Z gas stripper are expected due to the suppression of the electron capture process. This presenation will describe the results for the develeopments and tests of He gas stripper for uranium beams at 11 MeV/u.  
slides icon Slides THB01 [7.108 MB]  
THB03 Design Sudy for Front-End System at Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) rfq, ECR, emittance, simulation 207
  • E.-S. Kim
    KNU, Deagu, Republic of Korea
  • J. Bahng, J.G. Hwang, S.W. Jang
    Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea
  • B. Choi, D. Jeon, B. Kim, H. Kim, S.K. Kim
    IBS, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
  Heavy ion beams of 400 kW and 70 kW are generated at the RISP by in-flight and ISOL methods, respectively. Front-End system in the RISP consists of 28 GHz superconducting ECR-IS with 10 keV/u, LEBT with two-bends and a multi-harmonic buncher, a RFQ with 81.25 MHz and 300 keV/u, and MEBT with two re-bunchers. The design studies have been performed to optimize the beam and accelerator parameters to meet the required design goals. It is shown that the front-end simulations results can provide the two-charge state beams up to uranium to upstream linac with the required beam emittances. In this paper, we present the design results for the front-end system and on the beam dynamics.  
slides icon Slides THB03 [1.942 MB]  
THB04 Development of the Intensity and Quality of the Heavy Ion Beams at GSI rfq, emittance, vacuum, injection 211
  • L.A. Dahl, W.A. Barth, M.C. Bellachioma, L. Groening, O.K. Kester, M.M. Kirk, D. Ondreka, N. Pyka, P.J. Spiller, J. Stadlmann, H. Vormann, S.G. Yaramyshev
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • L.H.J. Bozyk, Y. El-Hayek
    FIAS, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • C. Xiao
    IAP, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  For injection into the future FAIR SIS100 synchrotron the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC and synchrotron SIS18 have to provide 1.5·1011 p/spill for the reference U28+ beam. The MeVVa ion source extracts 37 emA of U4+ beam. For improved transmission the RFQ vanes were revised and exchanged. A new ion source terminal with straightforward beam injection into the RFQ is calculated and partly realized for loss free beam transport to the RFQ. To improve the quality of the space charge dominated beam in the DFFD periodic focussing Alvarez section a transverse 4th order resonance was investigated by simulations and experimentally. The multi turn beam injection into the SIS18 requires emittances below βγεx/βγεy=0.8/2.5 [μm]. This suggests introducing a new concept for emittance transfer by solenoidal stripping. A set-up for experimental proof of principle will be installed at the foil stripper. The SIS18 has been equipped with NEG-coated chambers for all magnets and the injection septum. Newly installed ion catchers improve especially the dynamic vacuum pressure. The effect on progress in beam quality development and intensity will be reported.  
slides icon Slides THB04 [9.809 MB]  
THB05 The HITRAP Decelerator and Beam Instrumentation rfq, electron, diagnostics, instrumentation 217
  • F. Herfurth, Z. Andjelkovic, W.A. Barth, K. Brantjes, G. Clemente, L.A. Dahl, S. Fedotova, P. Gerhard, M. Kaiser, O.K. Kester, H.J. Kluge, C. Kozhuharov, M.T. Maier, D. Neidherr, W. Quint, A. Reiter, T. Stöhlker, G. Vorobjev, S.G. Yaramyshev
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • U. Ratzinger, A. Schempp
    IAP, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  A linear decelerator is being commissioned for heavy, highly-charged ions (HCI) at GSI in Darmstadt/Germany. HCI with only one or few electrons are interesting systems for many different experiments as for instance precision tests of the theory of quantum electrodynamics (QED). In order to transform heavy HCI produced at 400 MeV/u to stored and cooled HCI at low energy the linear decelerator facility HITRAP has been setup behind the experimental storage ring (ESR). The ions are decelerated in the ESR from 400 to 4 MeV/u, cooled and extracted. The ions are then matched to an IH-structure using a double drift buncher, decelerated from 4 to 0.5 MeV/u in the IH, and then down to 6 keV/u in a 4-rod RFQ. To detect and analyze the weak and sparse ion bunches a new type of energy analyzing detector has been developed along with improvements to other “standard” beam instrumentation. One million highly charged ions have been decelerated with the IH from 400 MeV/u to about 0.5 MeV/u per cycle. The RFQ has shown in off-line tests to decelerate ions, however, the measured acceptance does not fit the ion beam from the IH. This requires a refined design, which is underway.  
slides icon Slides THB05 [2.925 MB]