Keyword: cryomodule
Paper Title Other Keywords Page
MOB01 The FRIB Project – Accelerator Challenges and Progress linac, ion, cavity, controls 8
  • J. Wei, E.C. Bernard, N.K. Bultman, F. Casagrande, S. Chouhan, C. Compton, K.D. Davidson, A. Facco, P.E. Gibson, T . Glasmacher, L.L. Harle, K. Holland, M.J. Johnson, S. Jones, D. Leitner, M. Leitner, G. Machicoane, F. Marti, D. Morris, J.A. Nolen, J.P. Ozelis, S. Peng, J. Popielarski, L. Popielarski, E. Pozdeyev, T. Russo, K. Saito, R.C. Webber, J. Weisend, M. Williams, Y. Yamazaki, A. Zeller, Y. Zhang, Q. Zhao
    FRIB, East Lansing, USA
  • D. Arenius, V. Ganni
    JLAB, Newport News, Virginia, USA
  Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under Cooperative Agreement DE-SC0000661
The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, a new national user facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science to be constructed and operated by MSU, is currently being designed to provide intense beams of rare isotopes to better understand the physics of nuclei, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental interactions, and applications for society. The FRIB driver linac can accelerate all stable isotopes to energies beyond 200 MeV/u at beam powers up to 400 kW. Key technical R&D programs include low-beta cw SRF cryomodules and highly efficient charge stripping using a liquid lithium film or helium gas. Physical challenges include acceleration of multiple charge states of beams to meet beam-on-target requirements, efficient production and acceleration of intense heavy-ion beams from low to intermediate energies, accommodation of multiple charge stripping scenarios and ion species, designs for both baseline in-flight fragmentation and ISOL upgrade options, and design considerations of machine availability, tunability, reliability, maintainability, and upgradability. We report on the FRIB accelerator design and developments with emphasis on technical challenges and progress.
slides icon Slides MOB01 [4.891 MB]  
PO05 Control and Information System for BARC – TIFR Superconducting LINAC Booster controls, linac, booster, cryogenics 62
  • S. Singh
    BARC, Mumbai, India
  • J.N. Karande, V. Nanal, R.G. Pillay
    TIFR, Mumbai, India
  • P. Singh
    LEHIPA Project, Physics Group, Mumbai, India
  Superconducting LINAC booster is modular machine which consists of 7 cryomodules each consisting four quarter wave resonators and one superbuncher module. The control system is a mixed distributed control system. Geometrical distributed system architecture has been followed for RF control. RF control has four local nodes( RF LCS) each nodes catering to two cryostat. Two additional nodes are made for beam line system and cryogenics distribution system, making it a systematic distribution system. The system is developed on Linux operating system but the software is portable on Linux and Microsoft windows. The software is developed in two layers namely scanner and operator interface. Scanners interacts with the interface hardware. All scanners are developed in JAVA , which is very challenging job looking towards the feature of JAVA. Various issues regarding this were closely investigated and solved to overcome the deficiency of JAVA .A micro-controller based board has been developed for cryogenics line distribution system. Different subsystems of the control system has been developed independently. A complete integration of the system will be completed before Dec 2012.  
WEC02 Status of the HIE-ISOLDE Project at CERN linac, emittance, vacuum, cryogenics 175
  • Y. Kadi, A.P. Bernardes, Y. Blumenfeld, E. Bravin, S. Calatroni, R. Catherall, M.A. Fraser, B. Goddard, D. Parchet, E. Siesling, G. Vandoni, W. Venturini Delsolaro, D. Voulot, L.R. Williams
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  The HIE-ISOLDE project represents a major upgrade of the ISOLDE facility with a mandate to significantly improve the quality and increase the intensity and energy of radioactive nuclear beams produced at CERN. The project will expand the experimental nuclear physics programme at ISOLDE by focusing on an upgrade of the existing REX linac with a 40 MV superconducting linac comprising thirty-two niobium-on-copper sputter-coated quarter-wave resonators housed in six cryomodules. The new linac will raise the energy of post-accelerated beams from 3 MeV/u to over 10 MeV/u. The upgrade will be staged to first deliver beam energies of 5.5 MeV/u using two high-β cryomodules placed downstream of REX, before the energy variable section of the existing linac is replaced with two low-β cryomodules and two additional high-β cryomodules are installed to attain over 10 MeV/u with full energy variability from as low as 0.45 MeV/u. An overview of the project including a status summary of the different R&D activities and the schedule will be given here.  
slides icon Slides WEC02 [19.513 MB]