Keyword: target
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MOA01 Frontier Technologies and Future Directions in High Intensity ISOL RIB Production ion, proton, ISOL, vacuum 1
 
  • P.G. Bricault, F. Ames, N. Bernier, M. Dombsky, P. Kunz, F.S. Labrecque, J. Lassen, A. Mjøs, M. Nozar, J. Wong
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Funding: TRIUMF is funded by a contribution from the federal government through the National Research Council of Canada
The future frontier of the ISOL technique is to increase the intensity of the RIB beams. In the ISOL technique there are several ways to increase substantially the production of rare isotope beam. The most expedient one is to increase the incident beam on target. Increasing the overall release efficiency and ionization efficiency are the other two easiest ways to increase the overall RIB intensity. Now with the TRIUMF/ISAC facility the ISOL RIB facility can operate routinely up to 50 kW, this is 100 μA on target. But, the driver beam intensity cannot increase without considering the radiation damage issues and the challenge to the ion source itself where ionization efficiency are dramatically affected by target out-gazing. The other technology challenge for the ISOL technique is the target material itself. The main concern is the capability of the target material to sustain high power density deposited by the driver beam. Refractory metals foil target are suitable but nevertheless very limited in the available species we can produce with those targets. Composite targets, either for carbide and oxide target material were developed at ISAC that can sustain very high power density.
 
slides icon Slides MOA01 [3.651 MB]  
 
MOB02 Design Study of In-flight Fragment Separator for Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea shielding, radiation, dipole, quadrupole 20
 
  • J.-W. Kim
    NCC, Korea, Kyonggi, Republic of Korea
  • D.G. Kim, M. Kim, S.K. Kim, J. Song, C.C. Yun
    IBS, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
  • W. Wan
    LBNL, Berkeley, California, USA
 
  A heavy-ion accelerator complex is being designed for rare isotope beam production utilizing both in-flight fragmentation and ISOL methods in Korea. The project had been planned with conceptual design efforts, and officially launched in January this year with full funding promised. The driver accelerator is a superconducting linac with a beam power of 400 kW. The uranium beam, which is a primary beam for projectile fragmentation, is to be accelerated to 200 MeV/u. The in-flight fragment separator can be divided into pre and main separators. The target system and beam dump to handle the full beam power are located in the front part of the pre-separator, and are being studied using various codes such as PHITS and ANSYS considering issues especially related to radiation damage and shielding. Beam optics design was performed in the previous conceptual study, and further optimization is under way. The separator will be composed of large aperture superconducting quadrupole magnets and conventional dipole magnets, and prototyping of the superconducting magnet is planned. The status of the design efforts will be presented.  
slides icon Slides MOB02 [2.856 MB]  
 
MOB04 Argonne In-flight Radioactive Ion Separator dipole, ion, multipole, simulation 24
 
  • S.L. Manikonda, M. Alcorta, B. Back, J.A. Nolen, R.C. Pardo, E. Rehm, G. Savard, D. Seweryniak
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • B. Erdelyi
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357
The Argonne In-flight Radioactive Ion Separator (AIRIS) is a new large recoil separator that is being designed as a part of proposed future upgrade of the ATLAS facility to provide at least 10 times more collection efficiency than the existing system. In combination with other proposed upgrades it will provide a 2 orders of magnitude gain in the intensity for the in-flight produced secondary beams compared to the existing facility. The resulting unprecedented intensities for the recoil beam open new opportunities in several physics domains, e.g. gamma ray spectroscopy after secondary reactions, reactions for rp‐, νp‐, αp‐ processes and CNO cycle. The proposed design for the AIRIS device is based on four multipole magnets and four dipole magnets arranged in a so called broadband spectrometer configuration. This arrangement will be followed by two RF cavities to provide further selection based on velocity differences between the primary beam tail and the recoiling RIB. The advantages of such a design and key parameters will be discussed. We will demonstrate the performance of the device for few representative reaction cases that can be studied using AIRIS.
 
slides icon Slides MOB04 [1.626 MB]  
 
MOC01 Progress and Plans for High Mass Beam Delivery at TRIUMF linac, rfq, ISAC, ion 33
 
  • M. Marchetto
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
 
  ISAC is a TRIUMF facility for production and post-acceleration of radioactive ion beams (RIB). The RIBs are produced in two targets using a 500 MeV proton of up to 0.1 mA. The produced radioactive species are then ionized, extracted up to 60 kV, mass selected and transported to either the low energy experimental area or to the post-accelerators. The first stage of acceleration is accomplished via an RFQ followed by a DTL; at this medium stage the energy ranges between 0.15 MeV/u and 1.8 MeV/u for 3≤A/q≤7. The second stage of the acceleration uses a 40 MV superconducting linac for a final energy up to 18 MeV/u. High mass (>30) beams need multiple charges to be accepted by the RFQ. The single charge ions out of the target source are charge bred using an ECR charge state booster. The breeding process generates a significant amount of background contamination that masks the desired ions inside a mixed ”cocktail” beam. Such a cocktail needs to be cleaned of contaminants. An unprecedented effort is going on at TRIUMF trying to clean the high mass cocktail beams using the accelerator chain as filter. The progress and future plans of the project will be presented in this paper.  
slides icon Slides MOC01 [3.144 MB]  
 
PO02 GANIL Operation Status and Upgrade of SPIRAL1 ion, booster, ion-source, acceleration 51
 
  • F. Chautard, O. Bajeat, P. Delahaye, M. Dubois, P. Jardin, O. Kamalou, L. Maunoury, G. Sénécal
    GANIL, Caen, France
 
  The GANIL facility (Caen, France) is dedicated to the acceleration of heavy ion beams for nuclear physics, atomic physics, radiobiology and material irradiation. The production of stable and radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics studies represents the main part of the activity. The exotic beams are produced by the Isotope Separation On-Line method (ISOL, the SPIRAL1 facility) with SPIRAL1 facility. It is running since 2001, producing and post-accelerating radioactive ion beams. The review of the operation from 2001 to 2011 is presented. Because of the physicist demands, the facility is about to be improved with the project Upgrade SPIRAL1. The goal of the project is to extend the range of post-accelerated exotic beams avalaible.  
 
PO06 Extension of Superconducting LINAC Operation to Lighter Beams linac, controls, cryogenics, instrumentation 65
 
  • V. Nanal, R.D. Deshpande, P. Dhumal, J.N. Karande, R. Palit, R.G. Pillay, M.S. Pose, S.M. Powale, C. Rozario, S.K. Sarkar, M.E. Sawant, A.A. Shinde, S.R. Sinha, A.N. Takke
    TIFR, Mumbai, India
  • S. Singh
    LEHIPA Project, Physics Group, Mumbai, India
 
  The superconducting LINAC booster at Pelletron Linac Facility(Mumbai), has been fully operational since July 2007. The Liquid Helium Refrigeration plant for the LINAC has been upgraded to enhance the refrigeration capacity to ~450 Watts at 4.5K without LN2 pre-cool, from the earlier capacity of ~300 Watts. All beam lines in new user halls have been commissioned and new experimental setups have been added. Several experiments have been carried out using beams of 12C, 16O, 19F, 28Si, 31P. The QWR cavity is designed for β=0.1 and hence it is difficult to accelerate lighter beams. Due to growing interest in studying Li induced reactions on fissile targets at energies higher than 55 MeV, we have recently accelerated Li beam using four cryostat modules. Starting with 40 MeV Li beam from the pelletron, 56 MeV beam was successfully delivered at target station for a test experiment.  
 
PO16 MULTIPHYSICS AND PRESSURE CODE ANALYSIS FOR QUARTER WAVE β=0.085 AND HALF WAVE β=0.29 RESONATORS niobium, simulation, cavity, radio-frequency 92
 
  • S.J. Miller, J. Binkowski, A. Facco, M.J. Johnson, Y. Xu
    FRIB, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
 
  Funding: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under Cooperative Agreement DE-SC0000661
The driver linac design for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) makes use of four optimized superconducting radio frequency (RF) resonators to accelerate exotic ions to 200 MeV/μ. The RF resonators were optimized using computer simulations for all expected physical encounters and corresponding electrical resonant frequency changes. Principal guidance from the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code (BPVC) were applied.
 
poster icon Poster PO16 [0.535 MB]  
 
TUA03 The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source Status* rfq, proton, DTL, neutron 112
 
  • X. Guan
    TUB, Beijing, People's Republic of China
 
  Abstract The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China has been reported in this paper. CPHS consists of a proton linac, a neutron target station, and a small-angle neutron scattering instrument, a neutron imaging/radiology station, and a proton irradiation station. The proton linac accelerator part is composed of a ECR ion source. LEBT section, a RFQ accelerator, a DTL linac and a HEBT. A 3 meters long of RFQ machine can accelerate the proton to 3MeV. No MEBT will be requirement in this project. The Drift Tube Linac with permanent magnets focusing lens will accept the proton beam direct from RFQ. A 4.3 meters length of DTL will accelerate the beam up to 13MeV. The HEBT section will transport the proton beam from output of DTL to the center of MTR. Up to now, the IS/LEBT and the RFQ heve ready. The first phase of the CPHS construction is scheduled to complete 3MeV proton beam on the target in the middle of 2012.
*Work supported by the “985 Project” of the Ministry of Education of China,
**guanxialing7911@vip.sina.com
 
slides icon Slides TUA03 [3.998 MB]  
 
TUB01 Development of NRA System for a 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator-Human Resource Development Program for Nuclear Engineering, The University of Tokyo ion, electron, resonance, proton 115
 
  • S. Ito, H. Matsuzaki, A. Morita
    The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
 
  The 1.7MV tandem accelerator (RAPID) at the University of Tokyo has been used for various research projects and educational studies since its installation in 1994. Recently RAPID has contributed to educational program for study by utilizing high sensitive ion beam analysis methods of the accelerator. In the fall of 2011, we newly developed a NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) system with BGO scintillator. Detecting the resonant reaction 19F (p, αγ) 16O, a special student experimental class was successfully performed as a “Human resource development program for nuclear engineering”. The feature of this experiment is very few in advanced case study, which has performed with combine multiple ion beam correspond to a purpose for experiment. In this program students make their own samples for NRA analysis by ion implantation. Later in the year, RAPID will be relocated to the University of Tokyo (HIT facility) in Ibaraki prefecture to replace the 1MV tandem accelerator which was damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March of 2011.  
slides icon Slides TUB01 [1.426 MB]  
 
TUC01 Physical Design of the SPES Facility rfq, ion, plasma, linac 136
 
  • M. Comunian
    INFN/LNL, Legnaro (PD), Italy
 
  SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is the Italian project for a radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility based on a cyclotron as primary accelerator and on the existing superconducting linac ALPI as post accelerator. The cyclotron, energy up to 70 MeV and total current of 0.75 mA, shared on two exits, is in construction in the industry. The production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei, with ISOL technique, employs the proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx; the fission rate expected with a proton beam of 40 MeV and 0.2 mA, is 1013 fissions/s. The main goal of physical design of the SPES facility is to provide an accelerator system to perform forefront research in nuclear physics by studying nuclei far from stability, in particular neutron-rich radioactive nuclei with masses in the range of 80–160. The final RIB energy on the experimental target will be up to 11 MeV/A for A = 130, with an intensity in the range of 107–109 pps.  
slides icon Slides TUC01 [5.313 MB]  
 
TUC03 Laser Ablation of Solids into an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources for Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy laser, ion, ECR, plasma 149
 
  • T. Palchan, F.G. Kondev, S.A. Kondrashev, C. Nair, R.C. Pardo, R.H. Scott, R.C. Vondrasek
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • W. Bauder, P. Collon
    University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA
  • J.F. Berg, T. Maddock, G. Palmotti, G. Youinou
    INL, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA
  • G. Imel
    ISU, Pocatello, Idaho, USA
  • M. Paul
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem, Israel
  • M. Salvatores
    CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France
 
  Funding: This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
A project using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is underway at the ATLAS facility to measure the atom densities of transmutation products present in samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL. These atom densities will be used to infer effective actinide neutron capture cross-sections ranging from Thorium to Califorium isotopes in different neutron spectra relevant to advanced fuel cycles. This project will require the measurement of many samples with high precision and accuracy. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly-charged positive ions in an ECRIS followed by injection into a linear accelerator. We use a picosecond laser to ablate the actinide material into the ion source. We expect that the laser ablation technique will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than sputtering or oven evaporation thus reducing ‘cross talk’ between samples. In addition a multi-sample holder/changer is part of the project to allow for a quick change between multiple samples. The results of off-line ablation tests and first results of a beam generated by the laser coupled to the ECR will be discussed as well as the overall project schedule.
 
slides icon Slides TUC03 [1.610 MB]  
 
WEB03 DREEBIT EBIS/T for Applications in Accelerator Physics ion, ion-source, electron, injection 170
 
  • M. Schmidt, A. Thorn
    DREEBIT GmbH, Dresden, Germany
  • G. Zschornack
    Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Angewandte Physik, Dresden, Germany
 
  Funding: Supported by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology
Electron Beam Ion Sources and Traps provide light up to heavy ions of low up to high charge states for various applications in accelerator physics such as medical particle therapy and charge breeding. Beside the well-known but quiet costly superconducting EBIS/T type systems compact and permanent magnet-operated EBIS/T from the DREEBIT Company are available, favorable for low-budget projects. Moreover, the "flagship" of the DREEBIT ion source family, the superconducting EBIS-SC features operating parameters comparable to the complex and expensive systems in the EBIS/T community.
 
slides icon Slides WEB03 [3.655 MB]  
poster icon Poster WEB03 [7.892 MB]  
 
THB01 New Developments in Low-Z Gas Stripper Sstem at RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) ion, electron, acceleration, cyclotron 199
 
  • H. Okuno, N. Fukunishi, H. Hasebe, H. Imao, O. Kamigaito, M. Kase, H. Kuboki
    RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Japan
 
  Electron stripping process from heavy ion in material is a useful tool in accelerator complex to give higher charge state of the ion, allowing its effective acceleration. This process is competed with electron capture process and reach to the equilibrium charge state. Carbon foils is convenient for charge stripper but have short lifetime due to thermal stress and sputtering in the case of high power beam of heavy ion such as uranium. Gas is basically free from lifetime but gives lower charge state due to absent of density effect. Therefore, charge stripper especially for uranium beams at 10-20 MeV/u could be a bottle-neck problem in high power heavy ion facility such as RIBF, FRIB and FAIR. A charge stripper using low-Z gas (He or H2) is an important candidate to solve the problem because the high equilibrium mean charge states for the low-Z gas stripper are expected due to the suppression of the electron capture process. This presenation will describe the results for the develeopments and tests of He gas stripper for uranium beams at 11 MeV/u.  
slides icon Slides THB01 [7.108 MB]