Keyword: proton
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MOA01 Frontier Technologies and Future Directions in High Intensity ISOL RIB Production target, ion, ISOL, vacuum 1
 
  • P.G. Bricault, F. Ames, N. Bernier, M. Dombsky, P. Kunz, F.S. Labrecque, J. Lassen, A. Mjøs, M. Nozar, J. Wong
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
 
  Funding: TRIUMF is funded by a contribution from the federal government through the National Research Council of Canada
The future frontier of the ISOL technique is to increase the intensity of the RIB beams. In the ISOL technique there are several ways to increase substantially the production of rare isotope beam. The most expedient one is to increase the incident beam on target. Increasing the overall release efficiency and ionization efficiency are the other two easiest ways to increase the overall RIB intensity. Now with the TRIUMF/ISAC facility the ISOL RIB facility can operate routinely up to 50 kW, this is 100 μA on target. But, the driver beam intensity cannot increase without considering the radiation damage issues and the challenge to the ion source itself where ionization efficiency are dramatically affected by target out-gazing. The other technology challenge for the ISOL technique is the target material itself. The main concern is the capability of the target material to sustain high power density deposited by the driver beam. Refractory metals foil target are suitable but nevertheless very limited in the available species we can produce with those targets. Composite targets, either for carbide and oxide target material were developed at ISAC that can sustain very high power density.
 
slides icon Slides MOA01 [3.651 MB]  
 
MOC02 Progress of the SPIRAL2 Project cyclotron, ISOL, heavy-ion, neutron 40
 
  • E. Petit
    GANIL, Caen, France
 
  The SPIRAL2 facility will extend the possibilities offered at GANIL to heavier radioactive beams, with much higher intensities : it will provide intense beams of neutron-rich exotic nuclei created by the ISOL production method. The extracted exotic beam will be used either in a new low energy experimental area called DESIR, or accelerated by the existing SPIRAL 1 cyclotron (CIME. The intense primary stable beams (deuterons, protons, light and heavy ions) will also be used at various energies for nuclear physics, as well as for neutron-based research and multi-disciplinary research, in dedicated caves called S3 and NFS. During year 2008, the decision has been taken to build the SPIRAL2 machine in two phases: - first phase including the driver accelerator and its associated new experimental areas (S3 and NFS caves), - second phase including the RIB production part, with the low energy RIB experimental hall called DESIR, and the connection to the GANIL existing facility for post-acceleration by the existing CIME cyclotron. The SPIRAL2 facility is now in its construction phase, with the objective of obtaining the first beams for physics during year 2014 with the first phase.  
slides icon Slides MOC02 [5.173 MB]  
 
TUA03 The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source Status* rfq, target, DTL, neutron 112
 
  • X. Guan
    TUB, Beijing, People's Republic of China
 
  Abstract The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China has been reported in this paper. CPHS consists of a proton linac, a neutron target station, and a small-angle neutron scattering instrument, a neutron imaging/radiology station, and a proton irradiation station. The proton linac accelerator part is composed of a ECR ion source. LEBT section, a RFQ accelerator, a DTL linac and a HEBT. A 3 meters long of RFQ machine can accelerate the proton to 3MeV. No MEBT will be requirement in this project. The Drift Tube Linac with permanent magnets focusing lens will accept the proton beam direct from RFQ. A 4.3 meters length of DTL will accelerate the beam up to 13MeV. The HEBT section will transport the proton beam from output of DTL to the center of MTR. Up to now, the IS/LEBT and the RFQ heve ready. The first phase of the CPHS construction is scheduled to complete 3MeV proton beam on the target in the middle of 2012.
*Work supported by the “985 Project” of the Ministry of Education of China,
**guanxialing7911@vip.sina.com
 
slides icon Slides TUA03 [3.998 MB]  
 
TUB01 Development of NRA System for a 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator-Human Resource Development Program for Nuclear Engineering, The University of Tokyo ion, electron, resonance, target 115
 
  • S. Ito, H. Matsuzaki, A. Morita
    The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
 
  The 1.7MV tandem accelerator (RAPID) at the University of Tokyo has been used for various research projects and educational studies since its installation in 1994. Recently RAPID has contributed to educational program for study by utilizing high sensitive ion beam analysis methods of the accelerator. In the fall of 2011, we newly developed a NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) system with BGO scintillator. Detecting the resonant reaction 19F (p, αγ) 16O, a special student experimental class was successfully performed as a “Human resource development program for nuclear engineering”. The feature of this experiment is very few in advanced case study, which has performed with combine multiple ion beam correspond to a purpose for experiment. In this program students make their own samples for NRA analysis by ion implantation. Later in the year, RAPID will be relocated to the University of Tokyo (HIT facility) in Ibaraki prefecture to replace the 1MV tandem accelerator which was damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March of 2011.  
slides icon Slides TUB01 [1.426 MB]  
 
TUB04 LINAC Experience In The First Two Years of Operation @ CNAO (Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica) linac, rfq, synchrotron, injection 129
 
  • S. Vitulli, E. Vacchieri
    CNAO Foundation, Milan, Italy
  • A. Reiter, B. Schlitt
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
 
  CNAO is the first medical accelerator facility for deep hadrontherapy with C6+ and H3+ in Italy. The LINAC device at CNAO include a RFQ structure accelerating up to 400 keV/u and an IH structure works up to 7 MeV/u. Such LINAC works as injector in a 78 m circumference synchrotron where the beam reaches up to 400 MeV/u. The LINAC commissioning was performed during 2009 and from beginning of 2011, it entered into routine and continuous operation. First patient was treated in September 2011. The principal LINAC parameters are daily monitored, like output energy (by means of online not destructive ToF measurements), cavities voltage, cavities RF forward power, beam current transmission. No major faults were observed in the first two years of operation. LINAC beam is stable within an error of ±0.02 MeV/u. The relation between LINAC extraction and synchrotron injection is under investigation. This paper summarizes the monitoring issues (i.e. reproducibility of settings and beam parameters as well as long term stability measures) on the CNAO LINAC during daily patient treatments and outlines the measurements performed in the initial commissioning compared within actual status.  
 
WEA01 Advanced Accelerator Technology Aspects for Hadron Therapy ion, synchrotron, cyclotron, extraction 156
 
  • L. Falbo
    CNAO Foundation, Milan, Italy
 
  Nowadays cancer can be considered as one of the wide spread diseases all around the world. Radiotherapy is the clinical technique used in 40% of cancer treatments: nowadays about 40% of the 18000 particle accelerators running in the world are devoted to radiotherapy. Classical radiotherapy employs photons and electrons that damage not only the diseased cells but also the healthy ones. Hadrontherapy is a high-precision radiotherapy exploiting the depth-dose deposition characteristics of the hadron particles. The realization of machines for hadrontherapy is more challenging than for standard radiotherapy: while most of hospitals have a device for classical radiotherapy, the hadrontherapy needs a dedicated building with the needed technology for the hadron acceleration. The first hadrontherapy treatments have been performed in particle physics research centers clinically adapted; nowadays there are dedicated facilities designed and built as hadrontherapy centers. This paper will give an overview on the existing hadrontherapy centers presenting the technologic background that is at the basis of the hadrontherapy world.  
slides icon Slides WEA01 [4.493 MB]  
 
THA02 Overview of the RISP Superconducting Linac linac, ISOL 197
 
  • D. Jeon, Y. Chung, H.J. Kim, S.K. Kim
    IBS, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
  • E.-S. Kim
    KNU, Deagu, Republic of Korea
  • J.-W. Kim
    NCC, Korea, Kyonggi, Republic of Korea
  • Y.Y. Lee
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  The Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) got launched December 2011 which consists of In-Flight Fragmentation Facility and ISOL facility, providing uniques research opportunities in broad range of sciences. The superonducting driver linac can accelerate up to 200 MeV/u for uranium beam and up to 600 MeV for proton beam. The ISOL post linac which is also a superconducting linac. Design parameters and choices are presented.  
slides icon Slides THA02 [3.085 MB]  
 
THB02 New Design for the SARAF Phase II Linac linac, rfq 206
 
  • B. Mustapha, Z.A. Conway, M.P. Kelly, A. Kolomiets, S.V. Kutsaev, P.N. Ostroumov
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • J. Rodnizki
    Soreq NRC, Yavne, Israel
 
  Funding: This work was supported by the ANL WFO No. 85Y47.
We have developed a new design for the 40 MeV/u - 5 mA proton/deuteron SARAF Phase-II Linac. It includes a RFQ, room-temperature bunchers and two types of SC cavities. The new design is based on highly optimized ring-shaped HWR structures operating at 176 MHz, the same frequency as the current SARAF Phase-I linac. We will first present the optimized design of all the components from the RFQ to the SC cavities, then the proposed linac layout, and finally the results of end-to-end beam dynamics simulations including machine errors, realistic corrections and beam loss analysis.
 
slides icon Slides THB02 [2.634 MB]