Keyword: ISOL
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MOA01 Frontier Technologies and Future Directions in High Intensity ISOL RIB Production target, ion, proton, vacuum 1
  • P.G. Bricault, F. Ames, N. Bernier, M. Dombsky, P. Kunz, F.S. Labrecque, J. Lassen, A. Mjøs, M. Nozar, J. Wong
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
  Funding: TRIUMF is funded by a contribution from the federal government through the National Research Council of Canada
The future frontier of the ISOL technique is to increase the intensity of the RIB beams. In the ISOL technique there are several ways to increase substantially the production of rare isotope beam. The most expedient one is to increase the incident beam on target. Increasing the overall release efficiency and ionization efficiency are the other two easiest ways to increase the overall RIB intensity. Now with the TRIUMF/ISAC facility the ISOL RIB facility can operate routinely up to 50 kW, this is 100 μA on target. But, the driver beam intensity cannot increase without considering the radiation damage issues and the challenge to the ion source itself where ionization efficiency are dramatically affected by target out-gazing. The other technology challenge for the ISOL technique is the target material itself. The main concern is the capability of the target material to sustain high power density deposited by the driver beam. Refractory metals foil target are suitable but nevertheless very limited in the available species we can produce with those targets. Composite targets, either for carbide and oxide target material were developed at ISAC that can sustain very high power density.
slides icon Slides MOA01 [3.651 MB]  
MOB05 Rare-Isotope Beam Facilities in Asia ion, linac, cyclotron, heavy-ion 28
  • O. Kamigaito
    RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Japan
  Growing activities in the RIB facilities in Asian countries will be reviewed. Current status and future development will be discussed.  
slides icon Slides MOB05 [8.967 MB]  
MOC02 Progress of the SPIRAL2 Project cyclotron, heavy-ion, neutron, proton 40
  • E. Petit
    GANIL, Caen, France
  The SPIRAL2 facility will extend the possibilities offered at GANIL to heavier radioactive beams, with much higher intensities : it will provide intense beams of neutron-rich exotic nuclei created by the ISOL production method. The extracted exotic beam will be used either in a new low energy experimental area called DESIR, or accelerated by the existing SPIRAL 1 cyclotron (CIME. The intense primary stable beams (deuterons, protons, light and heavy ions) will also be used at various energies for nuclear physics, as well as for neutron-based research and multi-disciplinary research, in dedicated caves called S3 and NFS. During year 2008, the decision has been taken to build the SPIRAL2 machine in two phases: - first phase including the driver accelerator and its associated new experimental areas (S3 and NFS caves), - second phase including the RIB production part, with the low energy RIB experimental hall called DESIR, and the connection to the GANIL existing facility for post-acceleration by the existing CIME cyclotron. The SPIRAL2 facility is now in its construction phase, with the objective of obtaining the first beams for physics during year 2014 with the first phase.  
slides icon Slides MOC02 [5.173 MB]  
THA02 Overview of the RISP Superconducting Linac linac, proton 197
  • D. Jeon, Y. Chung, H.J. Kim, S.K. Kim
    IBS, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
  • E.-S. Kim
    KNU, Deagu, Republic of Korea
  • J.-W. Kim
    NCC, Korea, Kyonggi, Republic of Korea
  • Y.Y. Lee
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  The Rare Isotope Science Project (RISP) got launched December 2011 which consists of In-Flight Fragmentation Facility and ISOL facility, providing uniques research opportunities in broad range of sciences. The superonducting driver linac can accelerate up to 200 MeV/u for uranium beam and up to 600 MeV for proton beam. The ISOL post linac which is also a superconducting linac. Design parameters and choices are presented.  
slides icon Slides THA02 [3.085 MB]