MOC —  RIB Facilities   (18-Jun-12   14:00—16:00)
Chair: M.P. Kelly, ANL, Argonne, USA
Paper Title Page
MOC01 Progress and Plans for High Mass Beam Delivery at TRIUMF 33
  • M. Marchetto
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
  ISAC is a TRIUMF facility for production and post-acceleration of radioactive ion beams (RIB). The RIBs are produced in two targets using a 500 MeV proton of up to 0.1 mA. The produced radioactive species are then ionized, extracted up to 60 kV, mass selected and transported to either the low energy experimental area or to the post-accelerators. The first stage of acceleration is accomplished via an RFQ followed by a DTL; at this medium stage the energy ranges between 0.15 MeV/u and 1.8 MeV/u for 3≤A/q≤7. The second stage of the acceleration uses a 40 MV superconducting linac for a final energy up to 18 MeV/u. High mass (>30) beams need multiple charges to be accepted by the RFQ. The single charge ions out of the target source are charge bred using an ECR charge state booster. The breeding process generates a significant amount of background contamination that masks the desired ions inside a mixed ”cocktail” beam. Such a cocktail needs to be cleaned of contaminants. An unprecedented effort is going on at TRIUMF trying to clean the high mass cocktail beams using the accelerator chain as filter. The progress and future plans of the project will be presented in this paper.  
slides icon Slides MOC01 [3.144 MB]  
MOC02 Progress of the SPIRAL2 Project 40
  • E. Petit
    GANIL, Caen, France
  The SPIRAL2 facility will extend the possibilities offered at GANIL to heavier radioactive beams, with much higher intensities : it will provide intense beams of neutron-rich exotic nuclei created by the ISOL production method. The extracted exotic beam will be used either in a new low energy experimental area called DESIR, or accelerated by the existing SPIRAL 1 cyclotron (CIME. The intense primary stable beams (deuterons, protons, light and heavy ions) will also be used at various energies for nuclear physics, as well as for neutron-based research and multi-disciplinary research, in dedicated caves called S3 and NFS. During year 2008, the decision has been taken to build the SPIRAL2 machine in two phases: - first phase including the driver accelerator and its associated new experimental areas (S3 and NFS caves), - second phase including the RIB production part, with the low energy RIB experimental hall called DESIR, and the connection to the GANIL existing facility for post-acceleration by the existing CIME cyclotron. The SPIRAL2 facility is now in its construction phase, with the objective of obtaining the first beams for physics during year 2014 with the first phase.  
slides icon Slides MOC02 [5.173 MB]  
MOC03 Operational Considerations for Future Multi-user RIB Facilities 41
  • A.C. Morton
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
  TRIUMF's ISAC is an ISOL-type RIB facility. RIB are produced in direct reactions of 480–500 MeV protons from TRIUMF's main cyclotron on thick targets in one of two production target stations. Like other such facilities, ISAC is only capable of serving a single RIB user at any given time, though simultaneous delivery of stable and radioactive beams to different experimental areas is possible. With the construction of ARIEL, the Advanced Rare-IsotopE Laboratory, ISAC will gain a second production front end. RIB will be produced by photofission on actinide targets using electrons from a new superconducting electron linac. This will give ISAC the ability to serve two RIB experiments concurrently with beams produced by different reaction mechanisms in separate target areas (with delivery of a third, stable, beam still possible). The shift from single-user to multi-user RIB operation will introduce significant new complexity to beam delivery, requiring new tools and techniques for beam time to be used efficiently. A first look at the potential operational requirements of a multi-user RIB facility will be discussed.  
slides icon Slides MOC03 [4.945 MB]  
MOC04 Commissioning Experience with CARIBU 45
  • R.C. Vondrasek, S.I. Baker, P. Bertone, S. Caldwell, J.A. Clark, C.N. Davids, D. Lascar, A. Levand, K. Lister, R.C. Pardo, D. Peterson, D.R. Phillips, G. Savard, J.V. Schelt, M.G. Sternberg, T. Sun, B. Zabransky
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS superconducting linac facility aims at providing low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. These beams are obtained from fission fragments of a Cf-252 source, thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred with an ECR ion source to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. Low-energy mass separated radioactive beams have been extracted, charge bred with a 10% efficiency, reaccelerated to 6 MeV/u, and delivered to GAMMASPHERE for beta decay studies. In addition, the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer has been relocated to the CARIBU low-energy beam line. Mass measurements on over 42 neutron rich nuclei have already been performed and additional measurements are underway. In addition, a new tape station for beta decay studies has just been commissioned. In this talk I will describe the current status of the overall CARIBU system and the plans for bringing the system into full operation and use in research with accelerated beams.  
slides icon Slides MOC04 [3.744 MB]