Author: Pardo, R.C.
Paper Title Page
MOB04 Argonne In-flight Radioactive Ion Separator 24
  • S.L. Manikonda, M. Alcorta, B. Back, J.A. Nolen, R.C. Pardo, E. Rehm, G. Savard, D. Seweryniak
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • B. Erdelyi
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, USA
  Funding: This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357
The Argonne In-flight Radioactive Ion Separator (AIRIS) is a new large recoil separator that is being designed as a part of proposed future upgrade of the ATLAS facility to provide at least 10 times more collection efficiency than the existing system. In combination with other proposed upgrades it will provide a 2 orders of magnitude gain in the intensity for the in-flight produced secondary beams compared to the existing facility. The resulting unprecedented intensities for the recoil beam open new opportunities in several physics domains, e.g. gamma ray spectroscopy after secondary reactions, reactions for rp‐, νp‐, αp‐ processes and CNO cycle. The proposed design for the AIRIS device is based on four multipole magnets and four dipole magnets arranged in a so called broadband spectrometer configuration. This arrangement will be followed by two RF cavities to provide further selection based on velocity differences between the primary beam tail and the recoiling RIB. The advantages of such a design and key parameters will be discussed. We will demonstrate the performance of the device for few representative reaction cases that can be studied using AIRIS.
slides icon Slides MOB04 [1.626 MB]  
MOC04 Commissioning Experience with CARIBU 45
  • R.C. Vondrasek, S.I. Baker, P. Bertone, S. Caldwell, J.A. Clark, C.N. Davids, D. Lascar, A. Levand, K. Lister, R.C. Pardo, D. Peterson, D.R. Phillips, G. Savard, J.V. Schelt, M.G. Sternberg, T. Sun, B. Zabransky
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS superconducting linac facility aims at providing low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. These beams are obtained from fission fragments of a Cf-252 source, thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred with an ECR ion source to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. Low-energy mass separated radioactive beams have been extracted, charge bred with a 10% efficiency, reaccelerated to 6 MeV/u, and delivered to GAMMASPHERE for beta decay studies. In addition, the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer has been relocated to the CARIBU low-energy beam line. Mass measurements on over 42 neutron rich nuclei have already been performed and additional measurements are underway. In addition, a new tape station for beta decay studies has just been commissioned. In this talk I will describe the current status of the overall CARIBU system and the plans for bringing the system into full operation and use in research with accelerated beams.  
slides icon Slides MOC04 [3.744 MB]  
TUC04 Experiences and Lessons Learned at CARIBU with an Open 252Cf Source 155
  • S.I. Baker, J.P. Greene, A. Levand, R.C. Pardo, G. Savard, R.C. Vondrasek, L.W. Weber
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  Funding: This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
The CARIBU (the CAlifornium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade) project at ATLAS is based on the creation of beams of neutron-rich nuclei produced as fission fragments from the 3% fission branch that occurs naturally in the decay of Cf-252. These fission fragments are thermalized in ultrapure helium gas and turned into a charged beam for use by the ATLAS accelerator or ‘stopped’ beam experiments. This requires a very thin source, electroplated on a stainless steel or platinum backing so that the fission fragments escape into the helium gas and are efficiently thermalized and collected into an ion beam. The information learned from the successive use of two sources with strengths of 2 mCi and 100 mCi has now prepared us for the installation in mid-summer of a 500 mCi source recently produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper will describe the radiological monitoring system and our experience with the two weak “open” sources which have exercised and tested our radiological controls, emissions monitors, and procedures for the CARIBU facility and the source transfer area.
slides icon Slides TUC04 [1.605 MB]  
TUC03 Laser Ablation of Solids into an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources for Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy 149
  • T. Palchan, F.G. Kondev, S.A. Kondrashev, C. Nair, R.C. Pardo, R.H. Scott, R.C. Vondrasek
    ANL, Argonne, USA
  • W. Bauder, P. Collon
    University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA
  • J.F. Berg, T. Maddock, G. Palmotti, G. Youinou
    INL, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA
  • G. Imel
    ISU, Pocatello, Idaho, USA
  • M. Paul
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem, Israel
  • M. Salvatores
    CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France
  Funding: This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
A project using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is underway at the ATLAS facility to measure the atom densities of transmutation products present in samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL. These atom densities will be used to infer effective actinide neutron capture cross-sections ranging from Thorium to Califorium isotopes in different neutron spectra relevant to advanced fuel cycles. This project will require the measurement of many samples with high precision and accuracy. The AMS technique at ATLAS is based on production of highly-charged positive ions in an ECRIS followed by injection into a linear accelerator. We use a picosecond laser to ablate the actinide material into the ion source. We expect that the laser ablation technique will have higher efficiency and lower chamber contamination than sputtering or oven evaporation thus reducing ‘cross talk’ between samples. In addition a multi-sample holder/changer is part of the project to allow for a quick change between multiple samples. The results of off-line ablation tests and first results of a beam generated by the laser coupled to the ECR will be discussed as well as the overall project schedule.
slides icon Slides TUC03 [1.610 MB]