Author: Bernier, N.
Paper Title Page
MOA01 Frontier Technologies and Future Directions in High Intensity ISOL RIB Production 1
  • P.G. Bricault, F. Ames, N. Bernier, M. Dombsky, P. Kunz, F.S. Labrecque, J. Lassen, A. Mjøs, M. Nozar, J. Wong
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
  Funding: TRIUMF is funded by a contribution from the federal government through the National Research Council of Canada
The future frontier of the ISOL technique is to increase the intensity of the RIB beams. In the ISOL technique there are several ways to increase substantially the production of rare isotope beam. The most expedient one is to increase the incident beam on target. Increasing the overall release efficiency and ionization efficiency are the other two easiest ways to increase the overall RIB intensity. Now with the TRIUMF/ISAC facility the ISOL RIB facility can operate routinely up to 50 kW, this is 100 μA on target. But, the driver beam intensity cannot increase without considering the radiation damage issues and the challenge to the ion source itself where ionization efficiency are dramatically affected by target out-gazing. The other technology challenge for the ISOL technique is the target material itself. The main concern is the capability of the target material to sustain high power density deposited by the driver beam. Refractory metals foil target are suitable but nevertheless very limited in the available species we can produce with those targets. Composite targets, either for carbide and oxide target material were developed at ISAC that can sustain very high power density.
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